Bambi Part Three

Bambi Part Three

Legacy
The off-screen villain “Man” has been placed No. 20 on AFI’s List of Heroes and Villains.
Some critics have cited parallels between Frank Churchill’s theme music for “Man” (which consisted of 3 simple notes) and John Williams’s theme music in Jaws (which consists of two notes).
Former Beatle Paul McCartney has credited the shooting death of Bambi’s mother for his initial interest in animal rights.
Soon after the film’s release, Walt Disney allowed his characters to appear in fire prevention public service campaigns. However, Bambi was only loaned to the government for a year, so a new symbol was needed, leading to the creation of Smokey Bear. Bambi and his mother also make a cameo appearance in the satirical 1955 Donald Duck short No Hunting: drinking from a forest stream, the deer are startled by a sudden trickle of beer cans and other debris, and Bambi’s mother tells him, “Man is in the forest. Let’s dig out.”
In 2006, the Ad Council, in partnership with the United States Forest Service, started a series of Public Service Announcements that feature footage from Bambi and Bambi II for wildfire prevention. During the ads, as the Bambi footage is shown, the screen will momentarily fade into black with the text “Don’t let our forests…become once upon a time”, and usually (but not always) ending the ads with Bambi’s line “Mother, what we gonna do today?” followed by Smokey Bear saying “Only you can prevent wildfires” as the Smokey logo is shown on the screen. The ads air on various television networks, and the Ad Council has also put them on YouTube.
In December 2011, Bambi was among the films selected for preservation in the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry. In its induction, the Registry said that the film was one of Walt Disney’s favorites and that it has been “recognized for its eloquent message of nature conservation.”
American Film Institute
* AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Movies – Nominated
* AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Heroes and Villains:
* Man – No. 20 Villain
* AFI’s 100 Years of Film Scores – Nominated
* AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Movies (10th Anniversary Edition) – Nominated
* AFI’s 10 Top 10 – No. 3 Animated film

Sequel

Set in the middle of Bambi, Bambi II shows the Great Prince of the Forest struggling to raise the motherless Bambi, and Bambi’s doubts about his father’s love. The film was released direct-to-video on February 7, 2006. While the film was a direct-to-video release in the United States and other countries, including Canada, China, Hong Kong, Japan and Taiwan, it was a theatrical release in some countries, including Australia, Austria, Brazil, Dominican Republic, France, Mexico, the United Kingdom and some other European countries.

Copyrights
The copyrights for Bambi, A Life in the Woods were inherited by Anna Wyler, Salten’s daughter, who renewed them in 1954. After her death, Wyler’s husband sold the rights to Twin Books, a publishing company which subsequently filed a lawsuit against Disney, claiming Disney owed it money for the continued licensing for the use of the book. Disney countered by claiming that Salten had published the story in 1923 without a copyright notice, thus it immediately entered into the public domain. Disney also argued that if the claimed 1923 publication date was accurate, then the copyright renewal filed in 1954 had been registered after the deadline and was thus invalid. The courts initially upheld Disney’s view; however, in 1996, the Ninth Circuit Court reversed the decision on appeal.

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