Bonnie Raitt Part Two

Bonnie Raitt Part Two

Bonnie Raitt Part Two

I wasn’t sure if I should do this one,Bonnie Raitt Part Two yet, without doing Part Three tomorrow. However if I wasn’t going to do this one, then I should I do Part Three, without Part Two. People would laugh at me, thinking why put out Part Three without Part Two. So I decided to have Part Two, so nobody can laugh at me. (You can laugh ate me, but I can’t hear it, unless you live by me).

Tongue And Groove And Release From Warner Brothers

In 1983, as Raitt was finishing work on her follow-up album, entitled Tongue and Groove, Warner Brothers cleaned house, dropping a number of major artists such as Van Morrison and Arlo Guthrie from their roster. The day after mastering was completed on Tongue & Groove, the record label dropped Raitt also. The album was shelved indefinitely, and Raitt was left without a record label. By then, Raitt was also struggling with alcohol and drug abuse problems.
Despite her personal and professional problems, Raitt continued to tour and participate in political activism. In 1985, she sang and appeared in the video of Sun City, the anti-apartheid record written and produced by guitarist Steven VanZandt. Along with her participation in Farm Aid and Amnesty International concerts, Raitt traveled to Moscow in 1987 to participate in the first joint Soviet/American Peace Concert, later shown on the Showtime television networkAlso in 1987, Raitt organized a benefit in Los Angeles for Countdown ’87 to Stop Contra Aid. The benefit featured herself along with musicians Don Henley, Herbie Hancock, Holly Near and others.

Two years after dropping her from their label, Warner Brothers notified Raitt of their plans to release Tongue and Groove. I said it wasn’t really fair, recalled Raitt. I think at this point they felt kind of bad. I mean, I was out there touring on my savings to keep my name up, and my ability to draw was less and less. So they agreed to let me go in and recut half of it, and that‘s when it came out as Nine Lives. A critical and commercial disappointment, Nine Lives, released in 1986, would be Raitt‘s last new recording for Warner Brothers.

In late 1987, Raitt joined singers k.d. lang and Jennifer Warnes as female background vocalists for Roy Orbison‘s television special, Roy Orbison and Friends, A Black and White Night. Following this highly acclaimed broadcast, Raitt began working on new material. By then, she was clean and sober, having resolved her substance abuse problem. She later credited Stevie Ray Vaughan for his help in a Minnesota State Fair concert the night after Vaughan‘s 1990 death. During this time, Raitt considered signing with the Prince-owned Paisley Park label, but negotiations ultimately fell through. Instead she began recording a bluesy mix of pop and rock under the production guidance of Don Was at Capitol Records.

Raitt had met Was through Hal Wilner, who was putting together Stay Awake, atribute album to Disney music for A&M. Was and Wilner both wanted Raitt to sing lead on an adult-contemporary arrangement created by Was for Baby Mine, the lullaby from Dumbo. Raitt was very pleased with the sessions, and she asked Was to produce her next album.



1989 1999: Commercial Breakthrough



Raitt at the 1990 Grammy Awards

After working with Was on the Stay Awake album, Raitt‘s management, Gold Mountain, approached numerous labels about a new record deal, and she was signed to Capitol by A&R executive Tim Devine. At Capitol, after nearly 20 years, Raitt achieved belated commercial success with her tenth album, Nick of Time. Released in the spring of 1989, Nick of Time went to the top of the U.S. charts following Raitt‘s Grammy sweep in early 1990. This album has been voted number 230 in the Rolling Stone list of 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. Raitt herself pointed out that her 10th try was my first sober album.
At the same time, Raitt received a fourth Grammy Award for her duet In the Mood” with John Lee Hooker on his album The Healer. Nick of Time was also the first of many of her recordings to feature her longtime rhythm section of Ricky Fataar and James Hutch Hutchinson (although previously Fataar had played on her Green Light album and Hutchinson had worked on Nine Lives), both of whom record and tour with her to this day. Nick of Time has sold over six million copies in the US alone.

Raitt followed up this success with three more Grammy Awards for her 1991 album Luck of the Draw which sold nearly 8 million copies in the United States. Three years later, in 1994, she added two more Grammys with her album Longing in Their Hearts, her second no. 1 album. Both of these albums were multi-platinum successes. Raitt‘s collaboration with Was would amicably come to an end with 1995‘s live release, Road Tested. Released to solid reviews, it sold well enough to be certified gold.

Rock Steady was a hit written by Bryan Adams and Gretchen Peters in 1995. The song was written as a duet with Bryan Adams and Bonnie Raitt for her Road Tested tour, which also became one of her albums. The original demo version of the song appears on Adams 1996 single Let‘s Make a Night to Remember.

For her next studio album, Raitt hired Mitchell Froom and Tchad Blake as her producers. I loved working with Don Was but I wanted to give myself and my fans stretch and do something different, Raitt said. Her work with Froom and Blake was released on Fundamental in 1998.

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