Category 1920

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Five

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Five

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Five

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Five

Theirs not mush else to type about, except for her albums, films TV shows, which is long enough for a full blog, of over 300 hundred words, not many can I think of can do that on my website(wait, and see who else can do that). This is the conclusion of Peggy Lee, I hope you like her, like I like her(my girlfriend would kill me if I say love). This blog’s name is Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Five,( I hope it the blog’s name, for I was never introduce to it)...

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Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Four

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Four

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Four

Life And Times Of Peggy Part four

I know I did a blog of her just yesterday, but I just bought a new album, and I want you to listen to it. It’s easy to listen to her that I thought you would feel the same, so let’s get started and start on Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Four, and I’ll do the conclusion of her life tomorrow. Cheer up, that only means the second dice will also be there, and it isn’t an Christmas album.

Personal life

Peggy Lee was married four times; each marriage ended in divorce:

* Guitarist and composer Dave Barbour (1943–1951); daughter Nicki Lee Foster (1943–2014)

* Actor Brad Dexter (1953)

* Actor Dewey Martin (1956–1958)

* Bandleader and percussionist Jack Del Rio (1964–1965)

Retirement and death

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Life And Times Of Peggy ...

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Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Three

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Three

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Three

Life And Times Of Peggy Lee Part Three

I know it’s been awhile, but I haven’t been on my website for that long, so that makes it even. In my new blog Life And Times Of Peggy Lee, I’m going to type about her song writing, afterwards you can hear her Christmas album, which I wanted to upload last Christmas, but at less the thought was there and now you can play her album for this year and every Christmas to come (pretend you read this blog last year, so I can pretend that I diid, and the of us can be happy[please]).

Songwriting

Lee was a successful songwriter, with songs from the Disney movie Lady and the Tramp, for which she also supplied the singing and speaking voices of four characters...

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The Talented Sheb Wooley

The Talented Sheb Wooley

Sheb Wooley

Shelby Fredrick “Sheb” Wooley (April 10, 1921 – September 16, 2003) was a character actor and singer, best known for his 1958 novelty song “The Purple People Eater.” He played Ben Miller, brother of Frank Miller, in the film High Noon; played Travis Cobb in The Outlaw Josey Wales; and also had a co-starring role as scout Pete Nolan in the television series Rawhide.

Sheb Wooley

Wooley in 1971
Background information
Birth name Shelby Fredrick Wooley
Also known as Ben Colder
Born April 10, 1921
Erick, Oklahoma, U.S.
Died September 16, 2003 (aged 82)
Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
Genres Country, pop music
Occupations Actor, singer
Years active 1955–1971
Labels MGM
Wooley is also credited as the voice actor who produced the Wilhelm scream sound effect.

E...

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The Life And Times Of Glenn Miller Part Five

The Life And Times Of Glenn Miller Part Five

Arranging staff and compositions

Miller had a staff of arrangers who wrote originals like “String of Pearls” (written and arranged by Jerry Gray) or took originals like “In The Mood” (writing credit given to Joe Garland and arranged by Eddie Durham) and “Tuxedo Junction” (written by bandleader Erskine Hawkins and arranged by Jerry Gray) and arranged them for the Miller band to either record or broadcast...

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The Life And Times Of Count Basie Part Three

The Life And Times Of Count Basie Part Three

Post-war and later years

The big band era appeared to have ended after the war, and Basie disbanded the group. For a while, he performed in combos, sometimes stretched to an orchestra. In 1950, he headlined the Universal-International short film “Sugar Chile” Robinson, Billie Holiday, Count Basie and His Sextet. He reformed his group as a 16-piece orchestra in 1952. Basie credits Billy Eckstine, a top male vocalist of the time, for prompting his return to Big Band. He said that Norman Granz got them into the Birdland club and promoted the new band through recordings on the Mercury, Clef, and Verve labels. The jukebox era had begun, and Basie shared the exposure along with early rock’n’roll and rhythm and blues artists...

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The Life And Times Of Glenn Miller Part Four

The Life And Times Of Glenn Miller Part Four

Disappearance

U.S. Army Air Force UC-64

Miller’s monument in Grove Street Cemetery, New Haven, Connecticut
Miller spent the last night before his disappearance at Milton Ernest Hall, near Bedford. On December 15, 1944, Miller was to fly from the United Kingdom to Paris, France, to make arrangements to move his entire band there in the near future. His plane, a single-engined UC-64 Norseman, USAAF serial 44-70285, departed from RAF Twinwood Farm in Clapham, on the outskirts of Bedford and disappeared while flying over the English Channel. There were two others on board the plane: Lt. Col. Norman Baessell and pilot John Morgan.
A 2014 article in the Chicago Tribune reported that, despite many theories that had been proposed, Miller’s plane crash...

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The Life And Times Of Count Basie Part Two

The Life And Times Of Count Basie Part Two

John Hammond and first recordings


Basie and band, with vocalist Ethel Waters, from the film Stage Door Canteen (1943)
At the end of 1936, Basie and his band, now billed as “Count Basie and His Barons of Rhythm,” moved from Kansas City to Chicago, where they honed their repertoire at a long engagement at the Grand Terrace Ballroom. Right from the start, Basie’s band was noted for its rhythm section. Another Basie innovation was the use of two tenor saxophone players; at the time, most bands had just one. When Young complained of Herschel Evans’ vibrato, Basie placed them on either side of the alto players, and soon had the tenor players engaged in “duels”. Many other bands later adapted the split tenor arrangement.
In that city in October 1936, th...

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The Life And Times Of Count Basie Part One

The Life And Times Of Count Basie Part One

Count Basie

William James “Count” Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. His mother taught him to play the piano and he started performing in his teens. Dropping out of school, he learned to operate lights for vaudeville and to improvise accompaniment for silent films at a local movie theater in his home town of Red Bank, New Jersey. By age 16, he increasingly played jazz piano at parties, resorts and other venues. In 1924, he went to Harlem, where his performing career expanded; he toured with groups to the major jazz cities of Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City. In 1929 he joined Bennie Moten’s band in Kansas City, and played with them until Moten’s death in 1935.

Count Bas...

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The Life And Times Of Glen Miller Part Three

The Life And Times Of Glen Miller Part Three

Reaction from musical peers

Louis Armstrong thought enough of Miller to carry around his recordings, transferred to seven-inch tape reels when he went on tour. “[Armstrong] liked musicians who prized melody, and his selections ranged from Glenn Miller to Jelly Roll Morton to Tchaikovsky.” Jazz pianist George Shearing’s quintet of the 1950s and 1960s was influenced by Miller: “with Shearing’s locked hands style piano (influenced by the voicing of Miller’s saxophone section) in the middle [of the quintet’s harmonies]”. Frank Sinatra and Mel Tormé held the orchestra in high regard. Tormé credited Miller with giving him helpful advice when he first started his singing and song-writing career in the 1940s...

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