Category 1939

Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs

Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs

I’m sorry having to pay for my first film, The Wizard Of Oz, but I needed video on my website and YouTube gave me no exceptions, for the payment of Of the film, but their is video none the less, so I’m happy. I could buy the film, but I already have it in DVD and iTunes, but I wanted to have it more for entertainment than information, like others do, so I’ll have to try something else and give it a try.

Until I find a way to get more films on my website without having to use iTunes, until then, I’m going to continue with my attempt to let you see something on my website that others don’t have.

Which brings me to my next film, I’ve been asking the people who are hanging my website, for more space to upload my iTunes on my website, but that’s not going to happ...

Read More

The Life And Times Of Judy Collins Part Two

The Life And Times Of Judy Collins Part Two

Activism

Like many other folk singers of her generation, Collins was drawn to social activism. Her political idealism also led her to compose a ballad entitled “Che” in honor of the 1960s Marxist icon Che Guevara.
Collins sympathized with the Yippie movement and was friendly with its leaders, Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin. On March 17, 1968, she attended Hoffman’s press conference at the Americana Hotel in New York to announce the party’s formation. In 1969, she testified in Chicago in support of the Chicago Seven; during her testimony, she began singing Pete Seeger’s “Where Have All the Flowers Gone?” and was admonished by prosecutor Tom Foran and judge Julius Hoffman.
She is currently a representative for UNICEF and campaigns on behalf of the a...

Read More

The Life And Times Of Judy Collins Part One

The Life And Times Of Judy Collins Part One

Judith Marjorie “Judy” Collins (born May 1, 1939), affectionately known as “Judy Blue Eyes”, is an American singer and songwriter known for her eclectic tastes in the material she records (which has included folk music, show tunes, pop music, rock and roll and standards) and for her social activism.
Judy Collins

Judy Collins performing at the Bromeley Family Theater in Bradford, Pennsylvania, on February 5, 2009
Background information
Birth name
Judith Marjorie Collins
Born
May 1, 1939 (age 78)
Seattle, Washington, U.S.
Origin
Denver, Colorado, U.S.
Genres
* Folk country rock and roll pop
Occupations
* Singer songwriter musician actress
Instruments
* Vocals piano guitar
Years active
1959–present
Labels
* Elektra Geffen/MCA Mesa Bluemoon/Rhino...

Read More

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Seven

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Seven

Awards and honors

Academy Awards

Awards
Award
Date of ceremony
Category
Recipient
Outcome
Academy Awards
February 29, 1940
Best Picture
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Nominated
Best Cinematography, Color
Harold Rosson
Best Art Direction
Cedric Gibbons and William A. Horning
Best Effects, Special Effects
A. Arnold Gillespie and Douglas Shearer
Best Music, Original Score
Herbert Stothart
Won
Best Music, Original Song
“Over the Rainbow”
Music by Harold Arlen; Lyrics by E.Y. Harburg
Academy Juvenile Award
Judy Garland
For her outstanding performance as a screen juvenile during the past year. (She was jointly awarded for her performances in Babes in Arms and The Wizard of Oz).
Honorary

American Film Institute lists

The American Film Institute (AFI) has compiled vari...

Read More

The Life And Times Of Dusty Springfield Part Six

 lifeThe Life And Times Of Dusty Springfield Part Six

Personal

Springfield’s parents, Catherine and Gerard, lived in Hove, East Sussex from 1962. Catherine died in a nursing home there in 1976 of lung cancer. In 1979, Gerard died of a heart attack in Rottingdean, East Sussex.
Some of Springfield’s biographers and journalists have speculated that she had two personalities: shy, quiet, Mary O’Brien, and the public face she had created as Dusty Springfield. An editorial review at Publishers Weekly of Valentine and Wickham’s 2001 biography, Dancing with Demons, finds “… the confidence [Springfield] exuded on vinyl was a facade masking severe insecurities, addictions to drink and drugs, bouts of self-harm and fear of losing her career if exposed as a lesbian”...

Read More

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Six

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Six

Re-releases

Although the 1949 re-issue used sepia tone, as in the original release, beginning with the 1955 re-issue, and continuing until the film’s 50th anniversary VHS release in 1989, these opening Kansas sequences were shown in black and white instead of the sepia tone as originally printed. (This includes television showings.)
The MGM “Children’s Matinees” series rereleased the film twice, in both 1970 and 1971. It was for this release that the film received a G rating from the MPAA.
For the film’s upcoming 60th anniversary, it was given a “Special Edition” rerelease in the fall of 1998, digitally restored and with remastered audio.
In 2002, the film had a very limited rerelease in U.S. theaters.
On September 23, 2009, The Wizard of Oz was rerele...

Read More

The Life And Times Of Dusty Springfield Part Five

The Life And Times Of Dusty Springfield Part Five

Death

In January 1994, while recording her penultimate album, A Very Fine Love, in Nashville, Tennessee, Springfield felt ill. When she returned to England a few months later, her physicians diagnosed her with breast cancer. She received months of chemotherapy and radiation treatment, and the cancer was in remission. In 1995, in apparent good health, Springfield set about promoting the album, which was released that year. By mid-1996, the cancer had returned, and in spite of vigorous treatments, she died in Henley-on-Thames, Oxfordshire on 2 March 1999.
Her induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame had been scheduled two weeks after her death...

Read More

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Five

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Five

Song list

* “Over the Rainbow” – Judy Garland as Dorothy Gale
* Munchkinland Sequence:
* “Come Out …” – Billie Burke as Glinda, and the Munchkins
* “It Really Was No Miracle” – Judy Garland as Dorothy, Billy Bletcher, and the Munchkins
* “We Thank You Very Sweetly” – Frank Cucksey and Joseph Koziel
* “Ding-Dong! The Witch Is Dead” – Billie Burke as Glinda (speaking) and the Munchkins
* “As Mayor of the Munchkin City”
* “As Coroner, I Must Aver”
* “Ding-Dong! The Witch Is Dead” (Reprise) – The Munchkins
* “The Lullaby League”
* “The Lollipop Guild”
* “We Welcome You to Munchkinland” – The Munchkins
* “Follow the Yellow Brick Road/You’re Off to See the Wizard” – Judy Garland as Dorothy, and the Munchkins
* “If I Only Had a Brain” – Ray ...

Read More

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Four

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Four

Postproduction

Principal photography concluded with the Kansas sequences on March 16, 1939; nonetheless, reshoots and pick-up shots were filmed throughout April and May and into June, under the direction of producer LeRoy. After the deletion of the “Over the Rainbow” reprise during subsequent test screenings in early June, Judy Garland had to be brought back one more time to reshoot the “Auntie Em, I’m frightened!” scene without the song; the footage of Clara Blandick’s Auntie Em, as shot by Vidor, had already been set aside for rear-projection work, and was simply reused.
After Margaret Hamilton’s torturous experience with the Munchkinland elevator, she refused to do the pick-ups for the scene in which she flies on a broomstick that billows smoke, so...

Read More

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Three

The Wizard Of Oz (1939 Film) Part Three

George Cukor’s brief stint

Producer Mervyn LeRoy, after reviewing the footage and feeling Thorpe was rushing the production, adversely affecting the actors’ performances, had Thorpe replaced. During reorganization on the production, George Cukor temporarily took over, under LeRoy’s guidance. Initially, the studio had made Garland wear a blond wig and heavy “baby-doll” makeup, and she played Dorothy in an exaggerated fashion; now, Cukor changed Judy Garland’s and Margaret Hamilton’s makeup and costumes, and told Garland to “be herself”. This meant that all the scenes Garland and Hamilton had already completed had to be discarded and refilmed. Cukor also suggested that the studio cast Jack Haley, on loan from 20th Century Fox, as the Tin Man...

Read More