Category 1943

The Talented John Denver Part Five

The Talented John Denver Part Five

Related artists

Denver began his recording career with a group that had started as the Chad Mitchell Trio; his distinctive voice can be heard where he sings solo on Violets of Dawn, among other songs. He recorded three albums with the Mitchell Trio, replacing Chad Mitchell himself as high tenor. The group Denver, Boise, and Johnson, which had evolved from the Mitchell Trio, released a single before he moved on to a solo career.
Bill Danoff and Taffy Nivert, credited as co-writers of Denver’s song “Take Me Home, Country Roads”, were close friends of Denver and his family, appearing as singers and songwriters on many of Denver’s albums until they formed the Starland Vocal Band in 1976...

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The Talented John Denver Part Four

The Talented John Denver Part Four

Death


A Long-EZ two-seater canard plane
Denver was killed on October 12, 1997 when his experimental Adrian Davis Long-EZ plane, aircraft registration number N555JD, crashed into Monterey Bay near Pacific Grove, California, while making a series of touch-and-go landings at the nearby Monterey Peninsula Airport. The National Transportation Safety Board’s (NTSB) accident ID is LAX98FA008. Denver was the only occupant of the aircraft. Identification was not possible using dental records; only his fingerprints confirmed that the pilot was Denver.
A pilot with over 2,700 hours of experience, Denver had pilot ratings for single-engine land and sea, multi-engine land, glider, and instrument. He also held a type rating in his Learjet...

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The Talented John Denver Part Three

The Talented John Denver Part Three

Later years and humanitarian work

Denver had a few more U.S. Top 30 hits as the 1970s ended, but nothing to match his earlier success. He began to focus more on humanitarian and sustainability causes, focusing extensively on conservation projects. He made public expression of his acquaintances and friendships with ecological design researchers such as Richard Buckminster Fuller (about whom he wrote and composed “What One Man Can Do”) and Amory Lovins, from whom he said he learned much. He also founded two environmental groups; the Windstar Foundation and Plant-It 2020 (originally Plant-It 2000). Denver had a keen interest in solutions to world hunger...

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The Talented John Denver Part Two

The Talented John Denver Part Two

Career peak

His next album, Poems, Prayers, and Promises (released in 1971), was a breakthrough for him in the U.S., thanks in part to the single “Take Me Home, Country Roads”, which went to number 2 on the Billboard charts despite the first pressings of the track being distorted. Its success was due in part to the efforts of his new manager, future Hollywood producer Jerry Weintraub, who signed Denver in 1970. Weintraub insisted on a re-issue of the track and began a radio-airplay campaign that started in Denver, Colorado. Denver’s career flourished from then on, and he had a series of hits over the next four years. In 1972, Denver scored his first Top Ten album with Rocky Mountain High, with its title track reaching the Top Ten in 1973...

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The Talented Keith Richard Part Six

The Talented Keith Richard Part Six

Amplifiers

Richards’ amplifier preferences have changed repeatedly, but he is a long-time proponent of using low-powered amps in the studio, getting clarity plus distortion by using two amps, a larger one such as a Fender Twin run clean, along with a Fender Champ, which is overdriven. To record Crosseyed Heart, Richards used a stock tweed Fender Champ with 8″ speaker coupled with a modified Fender Harvard.
Some of his notable amplifiers are:
* Mesa/Boogie Mark 1 A804 – Used between 1977 and 1993, this 100-watt 1×12″ combo is finished in hardwood with a wicker grille. It can be heard on the Rolling Stones albums Love You Live, Some Girls, Emotional Rescue and Tattoo You, as well as on Richards’ two solo albums Talk is Cheap and Main Offender...

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The Talented John Denver Part One

The Talented John Denver Part One

John Denver
Henry John Deutschendorf Jr. (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), known professionally as John Denver, was an American singer-songwriter, record producer, actor, activist, and humanitarian, whose greatest commercial success was as a solo singer. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career with folk music groups during the late 1960s. Starting in the 1970s, he was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the decade and one of its best-selling artists. By 1974, he was firmly established as America’s best selling performer, and AllMusic has described Denver as “among the most beloved entertainers of his era”.
John Denver

Denver in 1973
Born
Henry John Deutschendo...

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The Talented Keith Richard Part Five

The Talented Keith Richard Part Five

Musical equipment

Guitars

Richards playing “Micawber,” a 1953 Fender Telecaster in 2006.
Richards has a collection of approximately 3,000 guitars. Even though he has used many different guitar models, in a 1986 Guitar World interview Richards joked that no matter what model he plays, “give me five minutes and I’ll make ’em all sound the same.” Richards has often thanked Leo Fender, and other guitar manufacturers for making the instruments, as he did during the induction ceremony of the Rolling Stones into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Some of his notable instruments are:
* Harmony Meteor – This was Richards’ main guitar in the Stones’ early periods; it was all but retired in 1964 when he acquired his Les Paul Standard.
* 1959 Gibson Les Paul Stand...

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The Talented Jim Morrison Part Six

The Talented Jim Morrison Part Six

Discography

Books

By Morrison

* The Lords and the New Creatures (1969). 1985 edition: ISBN 0-7119-0552-5
* An American Prayer (1970) privately printed by Western Lithographers. (Unauthorized edition also published in 1983, Zeppelin Publishing Company, ISBN 0-915628-46-5. The authenticity of the unauthorized edition has been disputed.)
* Arden lointain, edition bilingue (1988), trad. de l’américain et présenté par Sabine Prudent et Werner Reimann. [Paris]: C. Bourgois. 157 p. N.B.: Original texts in English, with French translations, on facing pages. ISBN 2-267-00560-3
* Wilderness: The Lost Writings Of Jim Morrison (1988). 1990 edition: ISBN 0-14-011910-8
* The American Night: The Writings of Jim Morrison (1990). 1991 edition: ISBN 0-670-83772-5

About ...

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The Talented Keith Richard Part Four

The Talented Keith Richard Part Four

Tributes for other artists


Richards paying tribute to fellow musicians Chuck Berry and Leonard Cohen at the first annual PEN Awards in the JFK Presidential Library in Boston, Massachusetts, 16 February 2012
From the start of his career Richards has made appearances to pay tribute to those artists with whom he has formed friendships and those who have inspired and encouraged him. After the earliest success of the band, who played cover songs of American blues artists, while he and Jagger were just beginning their own songwriting, the Rolling Stones visited the States to pay back, in his words, “that’s where that fame bit comes in handy”. Since that time, he has performed on many occasions to show appreciation toward them...

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The Talented Jim Morrison Part Five

The Talented Jim Morrison Part Five

Artistic influences

Jim Morrison Memorial in Germany (Berlin-Baumschulenweg)
As a naval family, the Morrisons moved frequently. As a consequence, Morrison’s early education was routinely disrupted as he moved from school to school. Nonetheless, he was drawn to the study of literature, poetry, religion, philosophy and psychology, among other fields. Biographers have consistently pointed to a number of writers and philosophers who influenced Morrison’s thinking and, perhaps, his behavior. While still in his adolescence, Morrison discovered the works of German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. He was also drawn to the poetry of William Blake, Charles Baudelaire, and Arthur Rimbaud...

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