Category Band

Tony Orlando And Dawn

Tony Orlando And Dawn

Tony Orlando and Dawn

Tony Orlando and Dawn is an American pop music group that was popular in the 1970s. Their signature hits include “Candida”, “Knock Three Times”, “Tie a Yellow Ribbon Round the Ole Oak Tree”, and “He Don’t Love You (Like I Love You)”.
Tony Orlando and Dawn

Telma Hopkins, Tony Orlando and Joyce Vincent Wilson at the premiere of their television show, 1974.
Background information
Also known as
Dawn
Dawn featuring Tony Orlando
Origin
New York City, New York, United States
Genres
Pop
Years active
1970–1977, 1988–1993, 2005, 2015
Labels
Bell, Elektra

Past members
Tony Orlando
Telma Hopkins
Joyce Vincent
Pamela Vincent

Early history

Tony Orlando was born Michael Anthony Orlando Cassavitis on 3 April 1944...

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The Parade (Band)

The Parade (Band)

The Parade (band)
The Parade was an American sunshine pop group from Los Angeles, California.
The Parade
Origin
Los Angeles, California, United States
Genres
Sunshine pop
Labels
A&M

Past members
* Jerry Riopelle
* Murray MacLeod
* Allen Roberds

Career

The group featured Jerry Riopelle, who played keyboards on several Phil Spector-produced records; Murray MacLeod, an actor who appeared on Hawaii Five-O and Kung Fu; and Allen “Smokey” Roberds, another actor. They wrote a song called “Sunshine Girl” which was picked up by A&M Records, and in 1967 the tune hit #20 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart. Among the session musicians on this recording were drummer Hal Blaine, bassist Carol Kaye, and saxophonist Steve Douglas...

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Steve Miller Band Part One

Steve Miller Band Part One

Steve Miller Band
The Steve Miller Band is an American rock band formed in 1966 in San Francisco, California. The band is led by Steve Miller on guitar and lead vocals. It is best known today for a string of (mainly) mid-1970s hit singles that are staples of classic rock radio, as well as several earlier acid rock albums. Miller left his first band to move to San Francisco and form the Steve Miller Blues Band. Shortly after Harvey Kornspan negotiated the band’s landmark contract with Capitol Records in 1967, the band shortened its name to the Steve Miller Band. In February 1968, the band recorded its debut album, Children of the Future. It went on to produce the albums Sailor, Brave New World, Your Saving Grace, Number 5, Rock Love and more...

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Sly And The Family Stone Part Four

Sly And The Family Stone Part Four

Awards and tributes

Sly and the Family Stone were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1993. The original members of the Family Stone were in attendance, except Sly. Just as the band took the podium to receive their awards, Sly suddenly appeared. He accepted his award, made some very brief remarks (“See you soon”), and disappeared from public view. In December 2001, Sly and the Family Stone were awarded the R&B Foundation Pioneer Award. Two Family Stone songs, “Dance to the Music” and “Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Again)”, are among The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine ranked them 43rd on their list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time.
A Sly and the Family Stone tribute a...

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Sly And The Family Stone Part Three

Sly And The Family Stone Part Three

Fresh (1973) and Small Talk (1974)

Despite the loss of the original rhythm section and Sly’s escalating cocaine use, the band’s next album, Fresh, was released in 1973. By this time, Sly’s sound had become more stripped down, yet more syncopated and rhythmically complex. Sly obsessively overdubbed the masters, as he had done with Riot. Although the record received mixed reviews at its release and did not receive the attention that the band’s earlier work had, Fresh has become recognized as one of the most important funk albums ever made. Rose Stone sang lead on a gospel-styled cover of Doris Day’s “Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be)”, and the single “If You Want Me to Stay” became a Top 20 hit in the U.S...

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Sly And The Family Stone Part Two

Sly And The Family Stone Part Two

Stand! (1969)


The Woodstock Music and Art Festival, at which Sly and the Family Stone performed on August 17, 1969.
In late 1968, Sly and the Family Stone released the single “Everyday People”, which became their first No. 1 hit. “Everyday People” was a protest against prejudice of all kinds and popularized the catchphrase “different strokes for different folks”. With its B-side “Sing a Simple Song”, it served as the lead single for the band’s fourth album, Stand!, which was released on May 3, 1969. The Stand! album eventually sold more than three million copies; its title track peaked at No. 22 in the U.S. Stand! is considered one of the artistic high points of the band’s career...

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The Wings Part Three

The Wings Part Three

Suzy and the Red Stripes

Suzy and the Red Stripes was a pseudonym used by the group for the release of the Linda McCartney and Wings single “Seaside Woman” in 1977. It was the only release by Wings under that name and was written and sung by Linda McCartney. Linda said that the “Suzy and the Red Stripes” pseudonym came about because she had been called “Suzi” in Jamaica because of “a fantastic reggae version of ‘Suzi Q'”, and Red Stripe is Jamaica’s leading brand of beer.

Partial reunions

In March 1997, Denny Laine, Lawrence Juber and Steve Holley did an impromptu “Wings” reunion at a Beatlefest convention in East Rutherford, New Jersey. This was not a planned event, and no further reunions were intended...

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The Wings Part Two

The Wings Part Two

1974–78: Second line-up

After Band on the Run, Jimmy McCulloch, former lead guitarist in Thunderclap Newman and Stone the Crows, joined the band. The first Wings project with McCulloch was McGear, a 1974 collaboration between Paul and his younger brother Mike McGear, with session musician Gerry Conway playing drums. Warner Bros. Records chose not to play up the “Wings” angle in its marketing for McGear, and the album sold poorly. However, the sessions also generated a single credited to McGear’s group the Scaffold, “Liverpool Lou”, which became a top-10 hit in the UK. Shortly thereafter, Geoff Britton joined Wings on drums, and the first recording session with this full line-up was held in Nashville, where the band stayed at the farm of songwriter Curly Putman Jr...

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The Plastic Ono Band Part Two

The Plastic Ono Band Part Two

Plastic Ono Band albums to “Happy Xmas (War is Over)”(1970–1971)

During the summer of 1970, Lennon and Ono undertook primal therapy under the guidance of Arthur Janov in Los Angeles. This therapy had a great effect on Lennon’s writing. In the meantime, the Beatles had publicly broken up, and the pair returned to London at the end of September to begin recording on a pair of studio albums, John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band and Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band. The core of the Plastic Ono Band backing the two was Klaus Voorman on bass and Ringo Starr on drums. Phil Spector produced the albums, and he and Billy Preston added keyboards to some select tracks. The Lennon album featured straightforward, stripped down rock, while Ono featured experimental and Avant-garde music...

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The Wings Part One

The Wings Part One

Wings, also known as Paul McCartney and Wings, were an Anglo-American rock band formed in 1971 by former Beatle Paul McCartney with his wife Linda on keyboards, session drummer Denny Seiwell, and former Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine. Wings were noted for frequent personnel changes as well as commercial success, going through three lead guitarists and four drummers. However, the core trio of the McCartneys and Laine remained intact throughout the group’s existence.
Wings

Wings, 1975. L–R: Joe English, Denny Laine, Linda McCartney, Jimmy McCulloch and Paul McCartney.
Background information
Also known as
Suzy and the Red Stripes
The Country Hams
Origin
England
Genres
Rock, soft rock
Years active
1971–1981
Labels
Apple, Capitol, Parlophone, Columbia

Past members
* P...

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