David Bowie Part Eight

David Bowie Part Eight

David Bowie Part Eight

I always like typing about him, and talking to my friends about him, every day, so David Bowie Part Eight, is something that I know.

1999 2012: Neoclassicist Bowie

 

David Bowie Part Eight

Bowie on stage with Sterling Campbell during the Heathen Tour, 2002
Bowie, with Reeves Gabrels, created the soundtrack for Omikron: The Nomad Soul, 1999 computer game in which he and Iman also voiced characters based on their likenesses. Released the same year and containing re-recorded tracks from Omikronhis album Hours featured a song with lyrics by the winner of his Cyber Song Contest Internet competition, Alex Grant. Making extensive use of live instruments, the album was Bowie‘s exit from heavy electronica. Sessions for the planned album Toy, intended to feature new versions of some of Bowie‘s earliest pieces as well as three new songs, commenced in 2000, but the album was never released. Bowie and Visconti continued their collaboration, producing a new album of completely original songs instead: the result of the sessions was the 2002 album Heathen.
On 25 June 2000, Bowie made his second appearance at the Glastonbury Festival in England, playing 30 years after his first. On 27 June, Bowie performed concert at BBC Radio Theatre in London, which was released in the compilation album Bowie at the Beeb, which also featured BBC recording sessions from 1968 to 1972. Bowie and Iman‘s daughter was born on 15 August.
In October 2001, Bowie opened the Concert for New York City, a charity event to benefit the victims of the September 11 attacks, with a minimalist performance of Simon & Garfunkel‘s America, followed by a full band performance of Heroes. 2002 saw the release of Heathen, and, during the second half of the year,the Heathen Tour. Taking place in Europe and North America, the tour opened at London‘s annual Meltdown festival, for which Bowie was that year appointed artistic director. Among the acts he selected for the festival were Philip GlassTelevision, and the Dandy Warhols. As well as songs from the new album, the tour featured material from Bowie‘s Low era. Reality (2003) followed, and its accompanying world tour, the A Reality Tour, with an estimated attendance of 722,000, grossed more than any other in 2004. Onstage in Oslo, Norway, on 18 JuneBowie was hit in the eye with a lollipop thrown by a fan; a week later he suffered chest pain while performing at the Hurricane Festival in Scheeßel, GermanyOriginally thought to be a pinched nerve in his shoulder, the pain was later diagnosed as an acutely blocked coronary artery, requiring an emergency angioplasty in Hamburg. The remaining 14 dates of the tour were cancelled. That same year, his interest in Buddhism led him to support the Tibetan cause by performing at a concert to support the New York Tibet House.

Bowie with his son Duncan Jones at the premiere of Jones‘s directorial debut Moon,2009
In the years following his recuperation from the heart attack, Bowie reduced his musical output, making only one-off appearances on stage and in the studio. He sang in a duet of his 1971 song Changes with Butterfly Boucher for the 2004 animated film Shrek 2.
During a relatively quiet 2005, he recorded the vocals for the song (She Can) Do That, co-written with Brian Transeau, for the film Stealth. He returned to the stage on 8 September 2005, appearing with Arcade Fire for the US nationally televised event Fashion Rocks, and performed with the Canadian band for the second time a week later during the CMJ Music Marathon. He contributed backing vocals on TV on the Radio‘s song Province for their album Return to Cookie Mountain, made a commercial with Snoop Dogg for XM Satellite Radio and joined with Lou Reed on Danish alt-rockers Kashmir‘s 2005 album No Balance Palace.
Bowie was awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award on 8 February 2006. In April, he announced, I‘m taking a year off no touring, no albums. He made a surprise guest appearance at David Gilmour‘s 29 May concert at the Royal Albert Hall in London. The event was recorded, and a selection of songs on which he had contributed joint vocals were subsequently released. He performed again in November, alongside Alicia Keys, at the Black Ball, a benefit event for Keep a Child Alive at the Hammerstein Ballroom in New York. The performance marked the last time Bowie performed his music on stage.
Bowie was chosen to curate the 2007 High Line Festival, selecting musicians and artists for the Manhattan event, including electronic pop duo AIR, surrealist photographer Claude Cahun, and English comedian Ricky Gervais. Bowie performed on Scarlett Johansson‘s 2008 album of Tom Waits covers, Anywhere I Lay My Head. On the 40th anniversary of the July 1969 moon landing and Bowie‘s accompanying commercial breakthrough with Space Oddity EMI released the individual tracks from the original eight-track studio recording of the song, in 2009 contest inviting members of the public to create a remix. A Reality Tour, a double album of live material from the 2003 concert tour, was released in January 2010.
In late March 2011, Toy, Bowie‘s previously unreleased album from 2001, was leaked onto the internet, containing material used for Heathen and most of its single B-sides, as well as unheard new versions of his early back catalogue.

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