Life Times Career Bing Crosby Part Two

Life Times Career Bing Crosby Part Two

Life Times Career Bing Crosby Part Two

Life Times Career Bing Crosby Part Two

I know it’s been awhile since I did the first of Bing Crosby, but I wanted to do others just to let you know that I like other performers So here’s the Life Times Career Bing Crosby Part Two, hope you like it.

Bing Crosby influenced the development of the postwar recording industry. He became the first performer to pre-record his radio shows and master his commercial recordings onto magnetic tape. Through the medium of recording, Bing Crosby constructed his radio programs with the same directorial tools and craftsmanship (editing, retaking, rehearsal, time shifting) used in motion picture production, a practice that became an industry standard. In addition to his work with early tape recording, he helped to finance the development of videotape, bought television stations, bred racehorses, and co-owned the Pittsburgh Pirates baseball team. Bing Crosby died at the age of 74 on October 14, 1977, from a sudden heart attack in Alcobendas, Spain.

Childhood

Life Times Career Bing Crosby Part Two

Life Times Career Bing Crosby Part Two

Bing Crosby aged nine
Crosby was born on May 2, 1903 in Tacoma, Washington, in a house his father built at 1112 North J Street. In 1906, Crosby’s family moved to Spokane, and in 1913, Crosby’s father built a house at 508 E. Sharp Avenue. The house now sits on the campus of Crosby’s alma mater Gonzaga University and formerly housed the Alumni Association.
He was the fourth of seven children: brothers Larry (1895–1975), Everett (1896–1966), Ted (1900–1973), and Bob (1913–1993); and two sisters, Catherine (1904–1974) and Mary Rose (1906–1990). His parents were Harry Lowe Crosby, Sr. (1870–1950), a bookkeeper, and Catherine Helen “Kate” (née Harrigan; 1873–1964). Crosby’s mother was a second generation Irish-American. His father was of English descent; an ancestor, Simon Crosby, had emigrated to America in the 17th century, and one of his descendants had married a descendant of Mayflower passenger William Brewster (c. 1567 – April 10, 1644).
In 1910, seven-year-old Harry Crosby Jr. was forever renamed. The Sunday edition of the Spokesman-Review published a feature called “The Bingville Bugle.” Written by humorist Newton Newkirk, The Bingville Bugle was a parody of a hillbilly newsletter filled with gossipy tidbits, minstrel quips, creative spelling, and mock ads. A neighbor, 15-year-old Valentine Hobart, shared Crosby’s enthusiasm for “The Bugle,” and noting Crosby’s laugh, took a liking to him, and called him “Bingo from Bingville.” Eventually, the last vowel was dropped and the nickname stuck.
In 1917, Crosby took a summer job as property boy at Spokane’s “Auditorium,” where he witnessed some of the finest acts of the day, including Al Jolson, who held Crosby spellbound with his ad libbing and spoofs of Hawaiian songs. Bing Crosby later described Al Jolson’s delivery as ”electric”

Bing Crosby was more than a singer to me, he was a comedian who teamed up with Bob Hope, but that will be texted here for next time, so continue your visits to my website and see what I’ll be texting about Bing Crosby next time.

It’s almost Christmas and I thought you would like a Christmas song so here it is !!!

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