Life Times Of Marvin Gaye Part Seven

Life Times Of Marvin Gaye Part Seven

Life Times Of Marvin Gaye Part Seven

Life Times Of Marvin Gaye Part Seven

 

Awards and honors

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducted him in 1987, declaring that Gaye “…made a huge contribution to soul music in general and the Motown Sound in particular.” The page stated that Gaye “…possessed a classic R&B voice that was edged with grit yet tempered with sweetness.” The page further states that Gaye “…projected an air of soulful authority driven by fervid conviction and heartbroken vulnerability.” A year after his death, then-mayor of D.C., Marion Barry declared April 2 as “Marvin Gaye Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund Day” in the city. Since then, a non-profit organization has helped to organize annual Marvin Gaye Day Celebrations in the city of Washington.
A year later, Gaye’s mother founded the Marvin P. Gaye Jr. Memorial Foundation in dedication to her son to help those suffering from drug abuse and alcoholism; however she died a day before the memorial was set to open in 1987. Gaye’s sister Jeanne once served as the foundation’s chairperson. In 1990, Gaye received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. In 1996, Gaye posthumously received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame listed three Gaye recordings, “I Heard It Through the Grapevine”, “What’s Going On” and “Sexual Healing”, among its list of the 500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll. American music magazine Rolling Stone ranked Gaye No. 18 on their list of the “100 Greatest Artists of All Time” and sixth on their list of “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”. Q magazine ranked Gaye sixth on their list of the “100 Greatest Singers”.
Three of Gaye’s albums – What’s Going On (1971), Let’s Get It On (1973), and Here, My Dear (1978) – were ranked by Rolling Stone on their list of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. What’s Going On remains his largest-ranked album, reaching No. 6 on the Rolling Stone list and topped the NME list of the Top 100 Albums of All Time in 1985[140] and was later chosen in 2003 for inclusion by the Library of Congress to its National Recording Registry. In addition, four of his songs – “I Heard It Through the Grapevine”, “What’s Going On”, “Let’s Get It On” and “Sexual Healing” – made it on the Rolling Stone list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.
In 2006, a park that Gaye frequented as a teenager called Watts Branch Park in Washington was renamed Marvin Gaye Park. Three years later, the 5200 block of Foote Street NE in Deanwood, Washington, D.C., was renamed Marvin Gaye Way. In August 2014, Gaye was inducted to the official Rhythm and Blues Music Hall of Fame in its second class. In October 2015, the Songwriters Hall of Fame announced Gaye as a nominee for induction to the Hall’s 2016 class after posthumous nominations were included. Gaye was named as a posthumous inductee to that hall on March 2, 2016. Gaye was subsequently inducted to the Songwriters Hall on June 9, 2016.

In popular culture

His 1983 NBA All-Star performance of the national anthem was used in a Nike commercial featuring the 2008 U.S. Olympic basketball team. Also, on CBS Sports’ final NBA telecast to date (before the contract moved to NBC) at the conclusion of Game 5 of the 1990 Finals, they used Gaye’s 1983 All-Star Game performance over the closing credits. When VH1 launched on January 1, 1985, Gaye’s 1983 rendition of the national anthem was the very first video they aired. Most recently,[when?] it was used in the intro to Ken Burns’ Tenth Inning documentary on the game of baseball.
“I Heard It Through the Grapevine” was played in a Levi’s ad in 1985. The result of the commercial’s success led to the original song finding renewed success in Europe after Tamla-Motown re-released it in the United Kingdom, Germany and the Netherlands. In 1986, the song was covered by Buddy Miles as part of a California Raisins ad campaign. The song was later used for chewing gum commercials in Finland and to promote a brand of Lucky Strike cigarettes in Germany.
Gaye’s music has also been used in numerous film soundtracks including Four Brothers and Captain America: The Winter Soldier, both of which featured Gaye’s music from his Trouble Man soundtrack. “I Heard It Through the Grapevine” was used in the opening credits of the film, The Big Chill. Gaye’s music has also become a source for samples in hip-hop recordings.
In 2007, his song “A Funky Space Reincarnation” was used in the Charlize Theron–starred ad for Dior J’Adore perfume. A documentary about Gaye—What’s Going On: The Marvin Gaye Story—was a UK/PBS co-production, directed by Jeremy Marre and was first broadcast in 2006. Two years later, the special re-aired with a different production and newer interviews after it was re-broadcast as an American Masters special. Another documentary, focusing on his 1981 documentary, Transit Ostend, titled Remember Marvin, aired in 2006.

 

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