The Talented Life Of John Williams Part Four

The Talented Life Of John Williams Part Four

The Talented Life Of John Williams Part Four

The Talented Life Of John Williams Part Four

I haven’t forgotten about The Talented Life Of John Williams, it’s just that his songs are too long for my website that I put him on hold, but not now. In The Talented Life Of John Williams Part Four, has more information about his soundtracks from films which we all like to watch all the time.

The Talented Life Of John Williams Part Four

The Talented Life Of John Williams Part Four

John Williams conducting the score to Raiders

of the Lost Ark in the Avery Fisher Hall.

For the 1976 Alfred Hitchcock film, Family Plot, Williams was not in love with this particular film, but did not want to turn down the chance to work for Hitchcock. Hitchcock merely told him that in scoring the film to remember one thing, “Murder can be fun.” Hitchcock was very satisfied with the result.

Williams worked with director Richard Donner to score the 1978 film Superman. The score’s heroic and romantic themes, particularly the main march, the Superman fanfare and the love theme, known as “Can You Read My Mind,” appeared in the four sequel films. For the 1981 film Raiders of the Lost Ark, created by Lucas and directed by Spielberg, Williams wrote a rousing main theme known as “The Raiders March” to accompany the film’s hero, Indiana Jones. He composed separate themes to represent the Ark of the Covenant, the character Marion, and the story’s Nazi villains. Additional themes were featured in his scores to the subsequent films in the franchise Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, a prequel (1984), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), and Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008). Williams composed an emotional and sensitive score to Spielberg’s 1982 fantasy film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial. Williams was awarded a fourth Academy Award for this score.

The Spielberg-Williams collaboration resumed with the director’s 1987 film Empire of the Sun, and has continued to the present, spanning genres from science fiction thrillers (1993’s Jurassic Park), to somber tragedies (1993’s Schindler’s List, 2005’s Munich), to Eastern-tinged melodramas (2005’s Memoirs of a Geisha, directed by Rob Marshall), to dramatic war films (1998’s Saving Private Ryan). Spielberg has said, “I call it an honorable privilege to regard John Williams as a friend.”

In 1999, George Lucas launched the first of a series of prequels to the original Star Wars trilogy. Williams was asked to score all three films, starting with The Phantom Menace. Along with themes from the previous films, Williams created new themes to be used as leitmotifs in 2002’s Attack of the Clones and 2005’s Revenge of the Sith. Most notable of these was “Duel of the Fates”, an aggressive choral movement in the style of Verdi’s Requiem, utilizing harsh Sanskrit lyrics that broadened the style of music used in the Star Wars films. Also of note was “Anakin’s Theme”, which begins as an innocent childlike melody and morphs insidiously into a quote of the sinister “Imperial March.” For Episode II, Williams composed “Across the Stars”, a love theme for Padmé Amidala and Anakin Skywalker (mirroring the love theme composed for The Empire Strikes Back). The final installment combined many of the themes created for the series’ previous films, including “The Emperor’s Theme,” “The Imperial March”, “Across the Stars”, “Duel of the Fates”, “The Force Theme”, “Rebel Fanfare”, “Luke’s Theme”, and “Princess Leia’s Theme”, as well as new themes for General Grievous and the film’s climax, entitled “Battle of the Heroes”.

In the new millennium, Williams was asked to score the film adaptations of J. K. Rowling’s widely successful book series, Harry Potter. He went on to score the film franchise’s first three installments. As with his Superman theme, the most important theme from Williams’s scores for the Harry Potter films, dubbed “Hedwig’s Theme”, has been used in the fourth through to the eighth films (Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 and Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2), scored by Patrick Doyle (Goblet of Fire), Nicholas Hooper (Order of the Phoenix and Half-Blood Prince) and Alexandre Desplat (Deathly Hallows). Like the main themes from Jaws, Star Wars, Superman, and Indiana Jones, fans have come to identify the Harry Potter films with Williams’s original compositions. Williams was asked to return to score the film franchise’s final installment, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2, but director David Yates stated that “their schedules simply did not align” as he would have had to provide Williams with a rough cut of the film sooner than was possible. In the 20th anniversary edition of E.T. The Extraterrestrial in 2002, Williams composed a reorchestrated score for the Universal Pictures logo with the variant of the movie itself, segueing to the notes from the movie.

In 2006, Superman Returns was completed under Bryan Singer’s direction, best known for directing the first two films in the X-Men series. Although Singer did not request Williams to compose a score for the intentionally Donner-esque film, he employed the skills of X2 composer John Ottman to incorporate Williams’s original Superman theme, as well as those for Lois Lane, Krypton and Smallville. In 2011, the “Main Title Theme” and elements of “Can You Read My Mind” were notably used in the final scene of “Finale,” the series finale of the WB/CW television series Smallville. Don Davis performed a similar role for Jurassic Park III, recommended by Williams himself to the producers.

In 2008, Williams returned to the Indiana Jones series to score the fourth film—Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. He received a Grammy nomination for his work on the film. Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull was also the only film score from the Indiana Jones film series not to be nominated for an Academy Award. During 2008, he also composed music for two documentaries, Warner at War, and A Timeless Call, the latter of which was directed by Steven Spielberg.After a three-year absence from film scoring, Williams composed the scores for Spielberg’s The Adventures of Tintin and War Horse in 2011. Both scores received overwhelmingly positive reviews, with both scores earning Academy Award nominations, and the latter being nominated for a Golden Globe. The Oscar nominations are Williams’s 46th and 47th, making him the most nominated musician in Academy Awards history (having previously been tied with Alfred Newman’s 45 nominations), and the second most nominated overall, following Walt Disney. Williams won an Annie Award for his score for The Adventures of Tintin in 2012. In 2012, Williams scored Spielberg’s film Lincoln and subsequently received his 48th Academy Award nomination.

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