The Wizard Of Oz Part Ten

The Wizard Of Oz Part Ten

The Wizard Of Oz Part Ten

The Wizard Of Oz Part Ten

In The Wizard Of Oz Part Ten, I’ll be typing about the many releases this film has done, and I have two different box set limited edition and another one from iTunes, so I’m happy with all three, and Ill take a photo of my two box sets, for prove, on my next blog. I just move in my new house, and I’m still putting away my things in order. Here’s The Wizard Of Oz Part Ten( I ran out of iTunes albums. I looked for more, but they only had two(one must have been a limited edition, which I’ll upload on previous blobs). I also have a box set, with more music than on any edition has, and I’ll be adding that to my blogs as well. Either from iTunes or my CD’s(or both), I want you to listen to them both, so please either be patient with me, or come over and help me find my collection, either way, you still have to wait for the download.

The Wizard Of Oz Part Ten

The Wizard Of Oz Part Ten

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum

 

Re-releases

Although the 1949 re-issue used sepia tone, as in the original release, beginning with the 1955 re-issue, and continuing until the film’s 50th anniversary VHS release in 1989, these opening Kansas sequences were shown in black and white instead of the sepia tone as originally printed. (This includes television showings.)
The MGM “Children’s Matinees” series rereleased the film twice, in both 1970 and 1971. It was for this release that the film received a G rating from the MPAA.
For the film’s upcoming 60th anniversary, it was given a “Special Edition” rerelease in the fall of 1998, digitally restored and with remastered audio.
In 2002, the film had a very limited rerelease in U.S. theaters.
On September 23, 2009, The Wizard of Oz was rereleased in select theaters for a one-night-only event in honor of the film’s 70th anniversary and as a promotion for various new disc releases later in the month. An encore of this event was released in theaters on November 17, 2009.
An IMAX 3D theatrical rerelease played at 300 theaters in North America for one week only beginning September 20, 2013, as part of the film’s 75th anniversary. Warner Bros. spent $25 million on advertising. The studio hosted a premiere of the film’s first IMAX 3D release on September 15, 2013, from the newly remodeled TCL Chinese Theatre (formerly Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, the site of the Hollywood premiere of the original film) in Hollywood. The film was the first to play at the new theater and served as the grand opening of Hollywood’s first 3D IMAX screen. The film was also shown as a special presentation at the 2013 Toronto International Film Festival.
In 2013, in preparation for its IMAX 3-D release, The Wizard of Oz was submitted again to the MPAA for re-classification. According to MPAA rules, a film that has been altered in any way from its original version must be submitted for re-classification, as the 3-D conversion fell within that guideline. Surprisingly, the 3-D version received a PG rating for “Some scary moments”, although no change was made to the film’s original story content. The 2-D version of The Wizard of Oz still retains its G rating.
The film was rereleased on January 11 and 14, 2015, as part of the “TCM Presents” series by Turner Classic Movies.

Television

The film was first shown on television on November 3, 1956, by CBS, as the last installment of the Ford Star Jubilee.

Home media

The Wizard of Oz was among the first videocassettes (on both VHS and Betamax format for the 1980 release) by MGM/CBS Home Video in 1980; all current home video releases are by Warner Home Video (via current rights holder Turner Entertainment). The first LaserDisc release of The Wizard of Oz was in 1982, with two versions of a second (one from Turner and one from The Criterion Collection with a commentary track) for the 50th-anniversary release in 1989, a third in 1991, a fourth in 1993, a fifth in 1995, and a sixth and final LaserDisc release on September 11, 1996.
Prior to the wide-home-video release in 1980, The Wizard of Oz was also released multiple times for the home-video commercial market (on a limited scale) on Super 8 film (8 mm format) during the 1970s. These releases include an edited English version (roughly 10 minutes, and roughly 20 minutes), as well as edited Spanish versions of the classic. Also, a full commercial release of The Wizard of Oz was made on Super 8 (on multiple reels) that came out in the 1970s, as well, for the commercial market.
In addition to VHS (and later, LaserDisc), the classic has been released multiple times during the 1980s on the Betamax format, beginning in 1980 simultaneously with the VHS release.
The movie was released for the first and only time on the CED format in 1982 by MGM/UA Home Video.
Outside of the North American and European markets, The Wizard of Oz has also been released multiple times on the Video CD format since the 1990s in Asia.
The first DVD release of the film was on March 26, 1997, by MGM/Turner and contained no special features or supplements. It was rereleased by Warner Bros. for its 60th anniversary on October 19, 1999, with its soundtrack presented in a new 5.1 surround sound mix. The monochrome-to-color transition was more smoothly accomplished by digitally keeping the inside of the house in monochrome while Dorothy and the reveal of Munchkinland are in color. The DVD also contained a behind-the-scenes documentary, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: The Making of a Movie Classic, produced in 1990 and hosted by Angela Lansbury, which was originally shown on television immediately after the 1990 telecast of The Wizard of Oz; it had been featured in the 1993 “Ultimate Oz” LaserDisc release. Out-takes, the deleted “Jitterbug” musical number, clips of pre-1939 Oz adaptations, trailers, newsreels, and a portrait gallery were also included, as well as two radio programs of the era publicizing the film.
In 2005, two DVD editions were released, both featuring a newly restored version of the film with audio commentary and an isolated music and effects track. One of the two DVD releases was a “Two-Disc Special Edition”, featuring production documentaries, trailers, various outtakes, newsreels, radio shows and still galleries. The other set, a “Three-Disc Collector’s Edition”, included these features, as well as the digitally restored 80th-anniversary edition of the 1925 feature-length silent film version of The Wizard of Oz, other silent Oz movies, and a 1933 animated short version.
The Wizard of Oz was released on Blu-ray on September 29, 2009, for the film’s 70th anniversary in a four-disc “Ultimate Collector’s Edition”, including all the bonus features from the 2005 Collector’s Edition DVD, new bonus features about Victor Fleming and the surviving Munchkins, the telefilm The Dreamer of Oz: The L. Frank Baum Story, and the miniseries MGM: When the Lion Roars. For this edition, Warner commissioned a new transfer at 8K resolution from the original film negatives. The restoration job was given to Prime Focus World. This restored version also features a lossless 5.1 Dolby TrueHD audio track. A DVD version was also released as a Two-Disc Special Edition and a Five-Disc Ultimate Collector’s Edition.
On December 1, 2009, three Blu-ray discs of the Ultimate Collector’s Edition were repackaged as a less expensive “Emerald Edition”, with an Emerald Edition four-disc DVD arriving the following week. A single-disc Blu-ray, containing the restored movie and all the extra features of the two-disc Special Edition DVD, also became available on March 16, 2010.
In 2013, the film was rereleased on DVD, Blu-ray, Blu-ray 3D, and UltraViolet for the 90th anniversary of Warner Bros. and as part of the film’s 75th anniversary.
Also, multiple special editions were released in celebration of the 75th anniversary in 2013, exclusively by both Best Buy (a SteelBook of the 3D Blu-ray) and another version that came with a keepsake lunch box.

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